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What’s it like to be young and black in America today?

If you use the new HBO series “Random Acts of Flyness” as your guide, it’s…bizarre.

Creator Terence Nance takes viewers on an abstract comedic journey in every episode of the show. But his narratives are about very relatable issues.

In a profile of Nance in The New York Times, reporter Reggie Ugwu writes:

A kangaroo of unknown origin is on the loose in Austria, raising eyebrows in the area around Hellmonsodt and causing confusion on the Internet.

Kangaroos are, of course, indigenous to Australia.

Austria is, of course, not Australia.

But there's a marsupial hopping about in Upper Austria, and no one knows why.

The suspected kangaroo — we add a caveat because it could well be a wallaby instead — has been seen "numerous times" over the past week or so, according to Agence France-Presse.

In the tribal region of Pakistan where Khalida Brohi grew up, girls didn't typically go to school. Instead, some were forced into marriage at a very young age — and punished by death if they don't act according to plan.

That's what happened to Brohi's 14-year-old cousin, Khadija. Khadija's family had arranged a marriage for her, but Khadija fell in love with someone else and ran away. Then, Brohi says, "Three men arrived and they took her ... to a place where her grave was already dug and she was murdered by my uncle right there."

There's life in the old road trip saga yet. That's just one of the many things that Gary Shteyngart's spectacular, sprawling new novel, Lake Success, affirms.

Throughout his career, Shteyngart has proven himself a cheeky comic daredevil, but never more so than in this novel. More than "just" an artistic tour de force, Lake Success aims — and succeeds — in saying something big about America today.

Purple sea urchins are spiny underwater invertebrates that look like pin cushions. They’re native to the ocean along the California coast, but their population has grown out of control recently. A band of divers is organizing an effort to restore balance to the ecosystem.

Democrats have called for more documents from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the George W. Bush White House to be released, following a late-night dump of more than 40,000 pages.

Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick is the face of Nike’s relaunch of the “Just Do It” campaign. There have been consumer protests, but so far no response from the NFL, which has an apparel deal with Nike.

Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins checks in with MSNBC anchor and economics correspondent Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi), co-host of “Velshi & Ruhle.”

South Florida’s largest utility wants to put more power lines underground to help prevent electrical outages during and after storms. With the prospect of rising seas and more severe storms, some question whether this is an adequate solution for keeping the power on.

Side Effects Public Media’s Christine Herman (@CTHerman) reports on a nationwide initiative to connect inmates to mental health care and keep them from landing back in jail.

Tropical Storm Gordon continues to gain strength and is expected to become a hurricane by the time it hits the central U.S. Gulf Coast.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins learns more about the storm with meteorologist Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp).

Top executives from Facebook and Twitter will appear at House and Senate hearings on Wednesday, answering questions about propaganda, censorship and regulating the tech industry.

Thirteen years ago, a pair of ruby slippers from the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz were stolen from a Minnesota museum. Now, the FBI says the search is over.

It was a classic smash-and-grab in August 2005: Some unknown thief or thieves broke in through the back door of the Judy Garland Museum in Grand Rapids, Minn., and swiped the slippers, reportedly leaving nothing but broken glass and a single red sequin in their wake.

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

In a surprise announcement on Tuesday, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said he will not be seeking a third term in office in the 2019 election.

Emanuel, a former congressman and White House chief of staff, has come under heavy criticism in recent years for an increase in gun violence in the city and tense police-community relations as a result of police shootings. He has also struggled to get a handle on rising pension debt.

But the announcement that he is walking away from the mayor's office is a political stunner.

Amazon's stock value briefly topped $1 trillion on Tuesday, a little over a month after Apple crossed the same milestone.

The tech and retail behemoth, founded as an online bookstore by CEO Jeff Bezos in 1994, has been consistently profitable only since 2015. In fact, Amazon profits have averaged $2 billion in each of the first two quarters of this year.

Updated at 11:13 a.m. ET

The combined newsrooms of the Virginia papers for the controversy-scarred Tronc newspaper company are following the path to unionization taken by counterparts at much larger Tronc papers in Los Angeles and Chicago, NPR has learned.

Updated at 11:44 a.m. ET

Fewer than 10 months after taking the job of USA Gymnastics president and CEO, Kerry Perry has resigned.

Perry has been under scrutiny from the U.S. Olympic Committee as USA Gymnastics attempts to navigate a path forward following a sexual abuse scandal by former team doctor Larry Nassar that involved hundreds of women and girls. Nassar has been sentenced to decades in prison.

According to a statement Tuesday by the USA Gymnastics board of directors, Perry's resignation is effective immediately.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Wednesday

A powerful typhoon made landfall in western Japan, causing extensive damage and multiple deaths.

At least 11 people have died as a result of Typhoon Jebi, the most powerful storm to hit the country in a quarter century, according to Japan's Kyodo news service. The Japan Times newspaper puts the number of injured at 110.

Updated at 2 a.m. ET

Tropical Storm Gordon has made landfall in Mississippi just west of the Alabama border, according to the National Hurricane Center. At least one death has been attributed to a fallen tree caused by the storm.

Forecasters have urged people along the Gulf Coast from Louisiana to Florida to be wary of a dangerous storm surge and flash floods.

John Kerry's new memoir, Every Day Is Extra, begins like Barack Obama's literary Dreams From My Father and — over the course of nearly 600 pages — slowly morphs into Hillary Clinton's paint-by-numbers political tome Hard Choices.

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NPR's weekly education roundup is back after a short hiatus. This edition features a longer list to catch you up on the news you may have missed over the long, hot summer.

1. Student loan ombudsman resigns, and slams the door

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expected to visit Pakistan tomorrow, just days after the United States canceled a military aid program. Here's NPR's Diaa Hadid in Islamabad.

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Viola Davis is known for her roles in movies like Fences and The Help. She's won an Oscar, an Emmy, a couple of Tony Awards — the list goes on and on.

But as we sit in her trailer on the set of the TV show in which she stars, How to Get Away with Murder, she tells me about a time before all of this — when she grew up in a condemned building in Rhode Island, sleeping on the top bunk with her sister to be safe from rats on the floor.

She had a way to get away from all that.

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Rumors have circulated for years regarding the death of Jalaluddin Haqqani, founder of the militant Haqqani network, who had close ties to the Taliban and al-Qaida.

Haqqani hadn't been heard from in years, and in 2015 reports of his death were widespread. Those earlier reports were never confirmed.

The Taliban on Tuesday released a statement announcing that Haqqani had died after a long illness at the age of 72.

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The first thing you notice about Drew Michael's new stand-up special is what's not there. There's no stage, no audience, no laughter, except for maybe your own - just a comic pacing in a shapeless darkness thinking out loud

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