Arts & Life

Arts and lifestyle coverage from around the globe and Illinois.

Ways to Connect

Updated at 6:54 p.m. ET

President Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said Wednesday that they have agreed to work toward removing all trade barriers between the two sides.

In a Rose Garden announcement, Trump said the EU had also agreed to buy U.S. soybeans, a day after he announced a $12 billion bailout package for farmers hit by retaliatory tariffs. Trump said the EU will also become a "massive buyer" of U.S. liquefied natural gas.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Parker Posey is not the kind of movie star who seems distant and unapproachable. Instead, people shout her most famous lines at her when they pass her on the street. "I've gotten 'Air raid!' for, you know, 25 years," she says, referencing 1993's Dazed and Confused. "And Busy Bee, you know — 'Where's my Busy Bee?' From Best in Show," one of five semi-improvised documentary spoof films she's made with the director Christopher Guest.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Poop is big business in Dakar, Senegal. That's because a lot of the homes have septic tanks, which need to be cleaned out regularly. The best way to clean your tank is by hiring a proper truck, which arrives with a vacuum.

The problem is that for years, the guys who drove the poop trucks operated as a cartel, and they squashed competition and kept prices high. So a lot of people turned to a cheaper alternative: Men who clear out septic tanks by hand, with shovels and buckets, and basically bury the poop in the street. It's terrible work and bad for the environment.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Starting next month, Sarah Hirshland will officially take over as CEO of the U.S. Olympic Committee. One of the big issues she will have to deal with is ongoing sexual abuse scandals.

In recent months, athletes have come forward in sports like swimming, gymnastics, diving and taekwondo with allegations of sexual abuse or assault. Many athletes don't go public until years after the alleged assaults take place. They stay silent in part because of the taboo around sexual abuse. In some cases, young people can't identify what has happened to them as a crime.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Kennedy Center annually recognizes artists who have had a uniquely wide and enduring impact on American culture. On Wednesday, the Washington, D.C.

Updated 10:50 p.m. ET

The family of Markeis McGlockton, who was shot and killed last week in a Clearwater, Fla., parking lot dispute, is calling on prosecutors to file charges against shooter Michael Drejka. The sheriff in Pinellas County, Bob Gualtieri, says deputies did not detain or arrest Drejka because of the state's controversial "stand your ground" law.

Democratic strategist Jamal Simmons (@JamalSimmons) and Republican strategist Alice Stewart (@alicetweet) join Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to talk about the recording of Trump and his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen, as well as other top politics stories this week.

With more than 700,000 open immigration cases across the country, judges face a lengthy backlog. Two retired District Court judges in California have proposed a solution: They petitioned Attorney General Jeff Sessions to let them and other retired federal judges return to the bench.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Judge Marilyn Hall Patel, one of the judges who wrote to the Justice Department, about why retired federal judges are a good fit for the job.

In this week’s Here & Now DJ Session, host Jeremy Hobson gets some music suggestions from Marion Hodges (@marionhodges), DJ at KCRW, including a lineup of shimmery synth-pop from SSION, Christine and the Queens and LUMP.

The Substation fire in northern Oregon burned more than 78,000 acres, most of it prime farmland for wheat. As Molly Solomon (@solomonout) of Oregon Public Broadcasting reports, it’s often farmers who are on the front lines fighting the blaze.

In the recovery community, there’s much debate about the best way to wean people who use drugs off opioids. Addiction specialists have straddled a philosophical divide over the use of pharmaceuticals in the process. But the side advocating against medication-assisted treatment is losing support.

Satellite images taken this week appear to show the dismantling of a key missile facility in North Korea. At the same time, however, leaked U.S. intelligence reports suggest Pyongyang may be ramping up its nuclear weapons program in secret.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

In a blow to President Trump, a federal judge says a lawsuit that alleges Trump's business interests violate the Constitution can proceed.

Federal District Judge Peter Messitte denied the Department of Justice's request to dismiss a case brought by the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia. The Emoluments Clause bars any president from personally profiting from his dealings with foreign governments — or even U.S. state governments.

President Trump does not make "mistakes" in the sense that the rest of us do.

We make mistakes, get corrected, make amends, apologize and move on. The president does not.

The president may not even tell "lies" in the sense that the rest of us might.

If we lie and are exposed, we face consequences that affect us personally. It is different for this president.

Suicide bombers struck an open-air market and other targets in the southern Syrian city of Sweida early Wednesday. The four attacks killed dozens of people and injured dozens more, local media say, in a region where the government has been fighting ISIS militants.

Citing the Syrian regime's state media agency, NPR's Ruth Sherlock reports, "The news report says a motorcycle bomber struck the marketplace just after dawn."

Yosemite National Park's most popular destination is shuttering as of Wednesday, as a large wildfire continues to sweep through thousands of acres nearby.

The Ferguson Fire, stretching west of the park, has burned more than 38,500 acres and was just 25 percent contained as of Wednesday morning.

An Italian team of scientists says it has strong evidence of a subsurface lake of liquid water on Mars. It's a discovery that adds to the speculation that there could once have been life on Mars — and raises the possibility that it might be there still today, since liquid water is an essential ingredient for life.

Sergio Marchionne, who led Fiat Chrysler to prosperity in the face of a stubborn recession and a host of other challenges, has died. He was 66. Just days ago, he stepped down from his role leading one of the world's largest car companies because of health problems.

Fiat Chrysler rushed to name a new CEO last weekend after it became clear that Marchionne would not be able to return to work. The widely admired executive had suffered complications from shoulder surgery, and his health rapidly deteriorated. He died at University Hospital in Zurich.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Georgia state Rep. Jason Spencer — who bared his buttocks and yelled racial slurs on camera in an episode of Sacha Baron Cohen's satirical Showtime series Who Is America? — will resign from the legislature despite an earlier insistence that he would stay.

A spokesman for Georgia House Speaker David Ralston told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution late Tuesday that Spencer would step down.

Wednesday's election in Pakistan marks the second time in the country's 71-year history that power will be passed from one civilian government to another. But the weeks leading to the vote have been marred by extreme violence. Activists, journalists and candidates say the campaign was tainted, throwing a fragile democratic process into question.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The year was 1978. The headline in the Daily Mail read as follows - "And Here She Is... The Lovely Louise."

NOEL KING, HOST:

That is Louise Joy Brown. She was born on this day 40 years ago.

Pages