Marketplace

Weekdays 6:30-7 p.m., 10:30-11 p.m.
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace  is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.  

This week Amazon said it wouldn't pursue a new headquarters in New York City and GE announced it’s dramatically downsizing its planned move to Boston. GE will now rent office space there, instead of building a 12-story office tower. It will also repay $87 million in incentives it received to make the move.

Efforts to expand broadband service in rural areas got a boost from the budget bill approved this week on Capitol Hill. Under the deal, the Department of Agriculture will receive $550 million to support broadband infrastructure in rural, underserved areas. It’s estimated that almost 30 percent of rural residents are without broadband compared to less than 1 percent of urban dwellers. The lack of fast broadband service is a major challenge for many rural economies and communities.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

About that spending bill ...

Feb 15, 2019

Congress approved a spending bill this week to support broadband infrastructure in underserved areas. Besides keeping the government open, we look at what that means for rural America. Then: How businesses are preparing for a no-deal Brexit. Plus, we talk about the biggest economic stories of the past seven days in the Weekly Wrap.

There’s a family of chemicals inside our bodies that's linked to birth defects, immune system problems and, possibly, cancer. The chemicals — known by the acronym P.F.A.S. — are contained in Teflon, which is found in everything from microwave popcorn bags to non-stick pans. This week, the Environmental Protection Agency made a plan to regulate the chemicals. Then a funny thing happened: The chemical industry seemed to cheer on the move, while environmental groups slammed it.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

As Brexit approaches, some Brits are stocking up

Feb 15, 2019

The deadlock over the terms of the United Kingdom’s departure from the EU continues and the prospect of the nation leaving the bloc without an exit deal looms larger. 

And that’s fueled an upsurge in stockpiling, which has reached the highest level in a G-7 country since comparable records began in 2007.  People and companies have been hoarding essential supplies out of fear that the deadline of March 29 will come without a deal, and that the flow of goods into Britain will suddenly be hampered by border checks, causing massive delays and shortages. 

New York Fashion Week ended with a bang on Wednesday when 50-year-old Christy Turlington closed Marc Jacobs in a black feathered gown, a matching hairpiece, and leather combat boots. It was the veteran supermodel’s first catwalk appearance in over 20 years.

How to be a cosmetic scientist

Feb 15, 2019

Everyone has a dream job growing up: doctor, vet, ice cream taste tester. But how do you actually get the gig? Marketplace is looking into how with the occasional series "How to Be A ..."

Makeup isn't just about beauty. It's also about science. Creating the right shade of red lipstick or pink blush takes meticulous research, an understanding of different skin tones, and a background in science.

Trump says he’s declaring emergency to build border wall

Feb 15, 2019

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump announced Friday that he will declare a national emergency to fulfill his pledge to construct a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Trump said he will use executive powers to bypass Congress, which approved far less money for his proposed wall than he had sought. He plans to siphon billions of dollars from federal military construction and counterdrug efforts for the wall. The move is already drawing bipartisan criticism on Capitol Hill and expected to face rounds of legal challenges.

Making money moves on border wall

Feb 15, 2019

President Donald Trump has declared a national emergency to secure funding for the much-touted wall along the southern border, but he faces an uphill battle. New data out Friday confirms low retail sales numbers for December from earlier this week. Plus, California's bullet train plans get rejiggered.

High-speed rail plans in California suffer setback

Feb 15, 2019

California will not pursue a high-speed rail line between San Francisco and Los Angeles after more than a decade of delays, rising costs and lawsuits. Gov. Gavin Newsom announced this week the state does not have the $100 billion to fully build out the project. It’s the latest setback for high-speed rail in the United States after more than a half century of attempts to build around the country. Why has the U.S. struggled to build the high-speed lines that are successful in Europe and Japan?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Imagine a world with a 4-day work week

Feb 15, 2019

What's next for New York City after Amazon announced its HQ2 will not be in The Big Apple anymore? The inspector general of the Dept. of Education says the agency is doing a lousy job of monitoring student loan servicing companies. Plus, what would the world be like if people worked four days a week? Two companies are trying out the idea.

The price of safety for Syrian refugees

Feb 15, 2019

From the BBC World Service... Spain has just announced snap elections after separatist Catalan politicians refused to back the proposed budget. We explore what the implications are for the eurozone’s fourth-largest economy. Another country headed to the polls is Nigeria, which has the most extreme poverty in the world. We take a closer look at what's at stake. Then, it's the largest displacement crisis since World War II. The war in Syria has shattered lives and sent shock waves through the region. Millions of refugees have fled in search of a better life.

This week activist shareholders in Alphabet, the parent company of Google, spoke out against development of Google's Dragonfly. That's the internal code name for a project reportedly working on a censored search engine for China.

We hear a lot about web censorship in China, but how does it work? What's it like to use? Host Jed Kim talks with Marketplace correspondent Jennifer Pak about it. Now based in Shanghai, Pak has reported from inside China for years. She says censorship is getting stronger.

This week, activist shareholders in Alphabet, the parent company of Google, spoke out against development of Google's Dragonfly. That's the internal code name for a project reportedly working on a censored search engine for China.

Near midnight, Roshan Owais was desperately trying to sell a drafting table that retailed for $300. She struggled to offload it for $65.

She was also trying to ditch a shelving unit, two leather armchairs and a wooden table. That’s on top of the three bags of clothes she already donated — all inspired by organizational guru Marie Kondo and her new hit Netflix show "Tidying Up with Marie Kondo." As in her 2014 bestselling book, Kondo encourages people to get rid of items that don’t "spark joy" for them.

In a search that was worthy of a TV game show, Amazon held a much-publicized hunt for a second headquarters last year. It received 238 proposals from cities keen to compete for the jobs and investment that could bring. In November, the Seattle based retail giant announced it would split the prize between Long Island City, New York, and Northern Virginia. But today, in a dramatic season two opener, Amazon pulled out of New York.

The 2020 census is going high-tech and online

Feb 14, 2019

Every 10 years, the U.S. government counts every living person in the country. The 2020 head count will be the first U.S. census conducted mostly online. “For more than 200 years, the census has been this pencil and paper activity,” said Issie Lapowsky, senior writer at WIRED. “It’s a really human intensive, really time-intensive process.” Lapowsky wrote recently about America’s first online census. She said the U.S.

Auto loan delinquencies rise for younger drivers

Feb 14, 2019

New car sales have been high for the past few years, and that means there are a lot more car loans out there. There are a lot more delinquent ones, too. According to a report from the New York Federal Reserve, 7 million borrowers are at least 90 days late on their payments, the highest level since 2012. The group with the most delinquencies: people under 30.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Retail sales fell in December ... or did they?

Feb 14, 2019

Retail sales fell by 1.2 percent in December, the biggest month-to-month decline in nine years. The drop surprised economists, who’d predicted an increase or, at worst, a modest decline. Some of the decline may be the result of consumers doing their year-end shopping earlier to take advantage of pre-holiday sales. Uncertainty thanks to volatile markets and the government shutdown may also have played a role. But the decline was so large that some analysts have pinned the blame on statistical noise.

Congress moves ahead with deal to avoid shutdown

Feb 14, 2019

Congress moved on Thursday to pass a nearly 1200-page spending bill in order to avoid another government shutdown ahead of Friday's deadline. The bill does not include the $5.7 billion that President Trump requested for a border wall, and Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement that the president would both sign the bill and “also take other executive action — including a national emergency — to ensure we stop the national security and humanitarian crisis at the border.”

Does this podcast spark joy?

Feb 14, 2019

Thanks to her best-selling book and new Netflix show, Marie Kondo is inspiring Americans to get organized. But what happens to all the stuff that doesn't "spark joy"? We look at the cost of tidying up and who foots the bill. But first: What you need to know about Amazon and New York City's big breakup, and the challenges that come with putting the census online.

Amazon, in stunning reversal, dumps NYC as new HQ site

Feb 14, 2019

Amazon will not build a new headquarters in New York City, a stunning reversal to an ambitious plan that would have brought an estimated 25,000 jobs to the city.

The online retailer faced fierce opposition from some New York politicians who were unhappy with the nearly $3 billion in tax incentives Amazon was promised. Along with thousands of jobs, the Seattle company had planned spend $2.5 billion building its new offices.

U.S. ski industry steps up climate lobbying

Feb 14, 2019

It's a snowy winter this year in many parts of the country, but winter season lengths are projected to get shorter in many regions. The ski industry is starting to adapt by offering more warm weather activities year-round and greening operations to defend its business.

No Sweethearts deal this Valentine's Day

Feb 14, 2019

Retail sales fell sharply in December, the biggest drop since The Great Recession. Auto sales are up, but a lot of people—particularly those in the younger set—aren't paying their car notes. We head to Colorado where the ski industry is voicing its concerns over dwindling snowfall and shorter seasons on the slopes. Plus, you know those candy hearts you get on Valentine's Day? Well, you're not getting any this year.

Airbus calls time on A380 superjumbo

Feb 14, 2019

From the BBC World Service… Showers and spa treatments while you fly. The Airbus A380 promised luxury when it first launched more than a decade ago. But the European aircraft manufacturer says it will stop making the world's largest passenger aircraft in 2021. Airbus boss Tom Enders explains the factors behind the decision. Then, Germany narrowly avoided falling into recession at the end of 2018. But with ongoing trade tensions threatening to undermine a nascent global recovery, will Europe's largest economy be able to bounce back?

The chemical bothers

Feb 14, 2019

The EPA says it's taking action on harmful chemicals known as "PFAS," which are found in everyday objects. Germany's economy didn't grow last year, and that's good news. Plus, we hear from Efosa Ojomo, author of "The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty," about taking a Silicon Valley-style approach to development.

This week, trade talks continue between the United States and China. U.S. officials complain that China has long failed to protect U.S. intellectual property rights, a charge China rejects. The U.S. wants China to put an end to what's known as "forced technology transfers." That's when U.S. companies have to share their valuable tech secrets with local partners in order to access China's much-coveted market. Finding a solution has been a big sticking point in trade negotiations. And the history of countries sparring over IP issues goes back centuries.

As trade talks continue between the United States and China, U.S. officials complain that China has long failed to protect U.S. intellectual property rights, a charge China rejects. The United States wants China to put an end to what's known as "forced technology transfers." That's when U.S. companies have to share their valuable tech secrets with local partners in order to access China's much-coveted market.

Finding a solution has been a big sticking point in trade negotiations. And the history of countries sparring over IP issues goes back centuries.

There are a number of interesting places people park their money to diversify beyond stocks and bonds. “Hobby” investing is a way for people to stash a little cash in something they enjoy. Back in the ‘90s, there was the Beanie Babies craze. Some people invest in jewelry and classic cars.

Airbus may kill production of A380 superjumbo jet

Feb 13, 2019

Once touted as an aircraft for the future, the Airbus A380 was supposed to offer international carriers with an appealing, if massive, option for long-haul flights. Now the A380 appears to be on life support. Emirates airlines has scaled back purchases of the aircraft, and Airbus is expected to fully shut down production soon. Airlines are turning to smaller, more fuel-efficient planes to meet the needs of customers and airports. Reduced demand for the Airbus A380 might seem like a positive for Boeing, but plane manufacturers have few guarantees in the air travel industry. 

Pages