How World War I Changed The World - A WACCI Presentation

Nov 6, 2018

Event Date: November 26

Reception 5:30 p.m.; Dinner 6:15 p.m.; Program 7:30 p.m.

Program: Student Union Ballroom, University of Illinois at Springfield

Dinner: Student Union Ballroom,University of Illinois at Springfield

All programs are free and open to the public. Dinners require a reservation.

2018 marks 100 years since the end of World War I – “The Great War,” the “War to End All Wars.” However, the 20th century continued to be scarred by devastating wars among nations. In commemorating the armistice on November 11, 1918 that ended World War I, the following interdisciplinary presentation illustrates the significant international and domestic effects of the world’s first global war.

Mr. Karl L. Rubis will discuss how World War I witnessed the appearance of modern, mechanized warfare, yet the massive destructiveness over four years resulted in a stalemate with no clear victor. Following the war, each major country innovated new military systems and coped with the new international political regimes.

Mr. Rubis has a M.A degree in American History and Military History from the University of Kansas and a B.A. degree in History from Pepperdine University. He also has a Certificate in International Relations from Johns Hopkins’ University School of Advanced International Studies. Mr. Rubis has taught courses at the University of Kansas, University of California at Los Angeles, Pepperdine University, and the University of Richmond. He is a member of the Society for Military History and has presented at its annual conferences. He has published articles and book reviews in Army History and other publications on military history and logistics. Mr. Rubis also is a graduate of the Naval War College who retired in 2016 from the U.S. Navy as a Naval Intelligence Officer.

Dr. Christine A. Anderson will explore the war that provided a rapid turning point in the women’s movement and the rise of modern feminism in the Western world. The women’s movement experienced an array of achievements and setbacks, and had vast social and cultural implications upon people’s daily lives.

Dr. Anderson has a Ph.D. in British History, a Graduate Certificate in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, a M.A. in British History from the University of Kansas, and a B.A. in History from the College of Wooster. Her research interests include late 19th and early 20th century cultural history and women’s history. Dr. Anderson has published several book reviews and anthology chapters in Feminist Writings from Ancient Times to the Modern World: A Global Sourcebook and History, Volume II: 1900-2009. She has taught courses at the University of Kansas, Marymount University, Richard Bland College of William and Mary, University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Anderson is a member of the North American Conference on British Studies, The Victorians Institute, the American Historical Association and the National Women Studies Association.