Equity

Race, Culture & Ethnicity

Police in North Carolina arrested seven people at protests for and against the presence of a Confederate soldier statue at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, the university said.

About 100 people faced off in "highly charged" demonstrations at the university's McCorkle Place — where until a group of protesters pulled it down on Monday, the statue known as "Silent Sam" had stood for more than a century.

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Pope Francis landed in Dublin on Saturday, his visit eclipsed by the latest sex abuse scandal that touched at least a thousand people in Pennsylvania and opened wounds in Ireland.

As he disembarked from the plane, the pope was greeted by Ireland's Deputy Premier and Foreign Affairs Minister Simon Coveney, his wife and their three daughters. One of the girls then presented Pope Francis with a bouquet of flowers.

It's a quarter past 2 a.m. My siblings and I are standing in an assembly line in the sunroom of our Ohio home, preparing falafel sandwiches. I'm in charge of the final stage: wrapping each one in aluminum foil, then cutting it into two pieces. We are preparing these for morning Eid prayer, and we will pass them out to worshippers who'll be attending in just a few hours. It's become an annual family tradition, and though the work is tiring, we feel rewarded. For as long as I could remember, this was Eid.

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Nearly two weeks after the release of a Pennsylvania grand jury's investigation into clergy sexual abuse, the report's ramifications on the Roman Catholic Church are being felt far beyond state lines.

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Morning News Brief

Aug 24, 2018

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As head of the Justice Department, it would have been Jeff Sessions' job to oversee the special counsel's investigation into the 2016 presidential election.

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Updated at 9:37 a.m. ET

The St. Louis Archdiocese is handing over its records to the state Attorney General's office for an investigation into the Missouri church's handling of sexual abuse accusations against clergy members.

The official purpose of Pope Francis' visit to Ireland this weekend is to attend the Vatican-sponsored World Meeting of Families held every three years.

But with multiple sexual abuse scandals buffeting the Catholic Church across the world, the two-day visit may turn out to be one of the most consequential trips of this papacy. The pope is under intense pressure to enact concrete measures to ensure accountability for church officials who ignored or covered up cases of clerical sex abuse.

As communities across the country grapple with what to do with their Confederate monuments, North Carolina has decided that three monuments at its state Capitol will remain in place.

A committee of the North Carolina Historical Commission says it finds the monuments to be "an over-representation and over-memorialization of a difficult era in NC history."

A few years ago, historian Douglas Selvage discovered the blueprint for a fake news campaign. It was a 1985 cable from the Stasi, the former East German police, outlining how the Soviet Union and its allies were working to promote the idea that AIDS was an American biological weapon. "We are carrying a complex of active measures, in connection with the appearance in recent years, of a new, dangerous disease in the United States: Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS."

Officials at the University of Scranton and King's College in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. have announced that buildings once honoring now-disgraced bishops will be renamed and that the bishops' honorary degrees will be revoked.

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Catholics around the country are reeling and reflecting after the release of a sweeping grand jury report that implicated 300 priests in the abuse of more than 1000 children in Pennsylvania.

The report contains searing details about minors who were victims of rape, assault, molestation and other abuses. And it articulates how the church’s hierarchy covered it up over decades.

Read the full report here.

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro was wrapping up his livestreamed address in Harrisburg last week, on the release of a bombshell grand jury report cataloging how the Catholic Church covered up the abuse of more than 1,000 minors by some 300 priests over 70 years, when he made an appeal: We want more survivors to report.

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It's the first week of class in a new school in Sumter County, Ala., and some fourth-graders are getting to know each other. They have pieces of colored paper they can do anything they want with — the idea is to be creative. Teacher Morri Mordecai cheers them on.

"They put theirs together and said it represented a rainbow," she says, pointing to one group. "Is that not cool?"

Pennsylvania Catholics are responding to last week's damning grand jury report on clergy sex abuse. Some priests addressed the report head on or read statements at Mass. Some parishioners who are standing by the priests maintain their faith in the Catholic Church. But many are grappling with what the abuse scandal means for their own faith and trust in the church.

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When it comes to cancer survival, the United States is sharply divided by race. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the cancer death rate for African-Americans is 25 percent higher than whites, and Hispanics and Latinos are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at a late, and more dangerous, stage of the disease.

Editor's Note: This story contains graphic descriptions that some readers may find disturbing.

Nearly a week after a Pennsylvania grand jury released its roughly 900-page report on sexual abuse by clergy, the leader of the Roman Catholic Church has penned a letter condemning the alleged misconduct and pledging repentance.

Updated at 1:11 p.m. ET

It's early evening at a Berlin bar where the hip, young, startup crowd sips artisanal gin cocktails. Miriam Davoudvandi is among them and feels right at home — until the bar tender asks her where she's really from.

Davoudvandi, 26, was born in Bucharest, to an Iranian father and Romanian mother, but she's been living in Germany since she was 6. 

She says that she's felt degraded for her diverse background since elementary school.

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