Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois

'Crime-Free Housing' Rules Spread In Illinois

Many communities in Illinois have rules that say renters can lose their housing if someone in the home is connected to a crime. City leaders who back the policies say the rules make neighborhoods safer. But fair housing advocates question the tactics.

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Bruce Rauner and J.B. Pritzker
still image from video / ABC 7 Chicago (WLS-TV)

Election 2018 — Lessons Learned?

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Pritzker To Decide If 'Tobacco 21' Becomes Law

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Illinois House Democratic Caucus

The Abortion Debate Is About To Heat Up In Illinois

Illinois could become the most progressive state in the nation on abortion rights if a proposed bill is approved this year.

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WATCH - LISTEN : As Goes Journalism, So Goes the Community

The number of news reporters has been declining for years – in print and broadcast, and markets of all sizes. One need only look at the Illinois State House Press Corps, whose numbers have dwindled from several dozen full-time, year-round reporters to a handful of credentialed journalists today, or the decreased size of local media news staff, to see the trend in our area. What’s the impact on you - and the community? Research shows that fewer journalists mean less accountability of public officials.

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Community Voices

ATTEND: Alatzas, Culhane, Korecki 2019 PAR Hall of Fame Inductees

The UIS Public Affairs Reporting (PAR) Hall of Fame
Monday, April 29, 2019, 5:30 p.m.

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Deathpenaltyinfo.org

The Illinois Supreme Court has announced the death at age 81 of former Chief Justice Moses Harrison.  
Harrison died Thursday at a St. Louis hospital. The cause of death wasn't immediately revealed.  
Harrison began his career on the bench in 1973 as a circuit court judge. He was serving on the 5th District Appellate Court when he was elected to the Supreme Court in 1992. He served as chief justice from 2000 to 2002.

WUIS Spring Drive Progress
Randy Eccles

WUIS program funding is $30,000 short at the completion of the spring on-air drive.

Rumer On Song Travels

Apr 5, 2013

Raised in England and Pakistan, Rumer possesses a deep connection to the heyday of the early-'70s singer-songwriter era, along with shades of Broadway, '30s jazz and gospel. Her debut album, Seasons of My Soul, reached No. 3 on the U.K. charts and was certified platinum.

Two Hours Of Jimi Hendrix On World Cafe

Mar 25, 2013

More than 40 years after Jimi Hendrix's death, the guitarist and singer's legacy continues to grow. His label recently released People, Hell and Angels, an album of 12 previously unreleased recordings that Hendrix was working on for a planned follow-up to 1968's Electric Ladyland.

The group's name draws influence from guitarist Django Reinhardt's Hot Club of France and the classic Western swing style of Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys. But Hot Club of Cowtown — guitarist Whit Smith, fiddler Elana Fremerman, and bassist Jake Erwin — is alive and swinging in the 21st century.

The band members recently stopped by NPR's Studio 4B to talk about their music with NPR's John Ydstie and play some tunes from their danceable repertoire.

Janis Martin, 'The Female Elvis,' Returns

Sep 30, 2012

Janis Martin was just a teenager from Virginia when she was christened "The Female Elvis." In the mid-1950s, she sold 750,000 copies of a song called "Will You, Willyum." She played the Grand Ole Opry, American Bandstand and The Tonight Show. But her fame was short-lived. Martin got married and had a baby, which didn't sit so well with the people managing her career. Her label dropped her, and she fell off the musical map.

Nicolas Kendall
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Violinist Nicolas Kendall, of the East Coast Chamber Orchestra (ECCO) and Time for Three, peforms at the WUIS Suggs Performance Studio previewing his guest role with the Illinois Symphony Orchestra.

Rhett Barnwell
Randy Eccles / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Harpist Rhett Barnwell joined Karl Scroggin to discuss music therapy and the Chiara Center's harp retreat weekend.

The thought of a baby dying suddenly and unexpectedly is one that keeps parents awake at night, fearing the worst. For years, little was known about sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. Babies would die in their sleep, and it was presumed that little could be done to prevent those deaths.

Several cities have "Hot Clubs" — bands that play so-called "Gypsy jazz" in the tradition of Django Reinhardt. There's the Hot Club of New York, San Francisco and Philadelphia.

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Arts & Life

Lindy West did not set out to make an after school special. The new Hulu show Shrill, based on her 2016 memoir about being feminist and body positive, is not "all about the message," she says.

"The reality of being a fat person isn't that every moment of your life is about being fat," she says. "It's that you're trying to live the same kind of complicated, exciting, fun, beautiful, difficult life as everyone else."

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Education Desk

Dusty Rhodes / NPR Illinois

A survey released this week suggests Illinois’ teacher shortage is getting worse, not better. Eighty-five percent of superintendents who responded said they’re having a tough time finding qualified teachers to fill vacancies. That’s up from 78 percent in 2017.

Lawmakers have been scrambling to figure out how to recruit more teachers. State Rep. Sue Scherer, a Decatur Democrat, is holding a hearing Wednesday afternoon, focused on changing licensure standards for teachers.

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Equity & Justice

Illinois House Democratic Caucus

Illinois could become the most progressive state in the nation on abortion rights if a proposed bill is approved this year.

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Health+Harvest Desk

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Reproductive-rights groups are fighting the new changes to the federal family planning program known as Title X. The new rule prohibits health providers under Title X funding to give information about abortions or refer patients to those who perform abortions. 

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Illinois Economy

Flickr user: TaxCredits.net

Stores in Illinois keep a portion of what you pay in sales tax. Think of it like a collection fee, though in state government shorthand it’s called a retail discount.

The amount is based on a percentage of what they collect. So the more they sell, the more they keep.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker wants to cap that amount to $1,000 per month for each retailer. It’s one of several proposals aimed at addressing a $3.2 billion deficit in next year’s budget.

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Statehouse

Bruce Rauner and J.B. Pritzker
still image from video / ABC 7 Chicago (WLS-TV)

Last year’s election was historic by several measures: the amount of money spent, the surge in turnout, and the Democratic sweep of Illinois government.

Every four years, the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University Carbondale analyzes the election, looking at everything from spending patterns to changes in voter behavior.

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Politics

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

This week in Idaho, some voters are speaking out against a bill that would make it harder for citizens to get issues they care about on the ballot – anything from Medicaid expansion to marijuana.

Twenty-six states allow for voter-driven initiatives but as that process becomes more popular, lawmakers from Maine to Utah and Idaho believe it's time to pull it back.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has long been known as a consumer advocate and a critic of big corporations. But she's not the only progressive seeking the right to challenge President Trump in 2020 who is highlighting economic inequality.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, for one, fired up the base with these issues in 2016, after Warren passed on a bid. But this time, she isn't sitting on the sidelines.

Late last year, retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor issued a statement announcing that she had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. It was a poignant moment, a reminder that for decades O'Connor was seen as the most powerful woman in America.

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All Songs Considered's 'Wow' Moments From SXSW 2019

Cautious Clay performs at the Tiny Desk Family Hour at Central Presbyterian Church in Austin, TX during the SXSW 2019 music festival. Adam Kissick / Courtesy of the photographer Each year, the buzz in Austin, Texas, at the South By Southwest music festival can reach a deafening pitch. Our NPR Music team is here to help you cut through the noise. Every evening, we'll gather to roundup and recap the best discoveries of the day. Keep up with our coverage of SXSW 2019 by subscribing to All Songs...

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NPR Illinois Classic - STREAM ONLY UNTIL NEW TRANSMITTER COMPLETE

NPR Music's Best Classical Albums Of 2018

Narrowing a list to just 10 is always a painful game. This year, amid a multitude of albums, I found favorite musicians ( Víkingur Ólafsson ), newcomers (the young Aizuri Quartet) and familiar players in compelling collaborations ( Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera ), all offering fascinating performances of music from the baroque to the freshly minted. Think of the albums on this list as portals. They'll take you to Tsarist Russia, the New Mexico desert, 18th-century Spain, the austere...

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