Top Stories

Katie Buck / NPR ILLINOIS | 91.9 UIS

Food Aid To Continue Despite Shutdown, For Now

Despite the federal government shutdown, Illinoisans will continue getting food aid through February.

Read More

Trending Stories

J.B. Pritzker
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

The Pritzker Agenda

Gov.-elect J.B. Pritzker takes office next week on the heels of the most decisive election victory in a generation. And he’ll be working to pass his agenda through the biggest Democratic majorities in the General Assembly since the 1960s. That raises a question: What precisely does that agenda consist of?

Read More

Statehouse

Katie Buck / NPR ILLINOIS | 91.9 UIS

Despite the federal government shutdown, Illinoisans will continue getting food aid through February.

Read More Statehouse Stories

Education Desk

Photo illustration by Søren Daum

Statistics show that only about one-third of sexual assaults get reported to authorities. But a new Illinois law removes some of the barriers that could prevent rape victims from coming forward. Dubbed "the survivors’ bill of rights," this legislation offers protections plus some small comforts for people reporting sexual assault.

Read More Education Stories

Health+Harvest Desk

Farmers in Illinois are getting closer to growing industrial hemp. The Department of Agriculture (IDOA) drafted rules for the program which lay out who can grow it, where and how much it will cost.

Read More Health+Harvest Stories

Illinois Economy

Sam Dunklau / NPR Illinois

The need for new or repaired roads, bridges, buildings and other infrastructure in Illinois continues to outpace the amount of funding available to complete the projects. With a new governor and legislative session starting in January, discussions have already started with an aim to change that.

Read More Illinois Economy Coverage

Equity

Sam Dunklau / NPR Illinois

In the wake of Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s Catholic Church investigation, a victim’s advocacy group is accusing the Catholic Diocese of Springfield of intentionally leaving the names of two predator priests off its public list. They say those names are part of the group of 500 Madigan uncovered.


Read More Equity Stories

Arts & Life

The newest novel by celebrated Chinese novelist Yan Lianke is a poetic nightmare that's being compared with James Joyce's Ulysses.

Read More Arts & Life Stories

This I Believe: A Koala Bear

Jan 29, 2007
Lauren Ross in the studio
NPR Illinois

I barely remember yet I remember so vividly, I was on 5 years old. Excited about approaching kindergarten: I couldn't wait to ride the bus, go to the cafeteria, play on the playground and make new friends. I was an unstoppable bundle of energy waiting for my first day of school. Sleep the night before the before the class listing was posted on the school door was impossible. I had shopped for all my supplies and they were ready to occupy my desk on the very first day. However, my life changed drastically and sadly I never arrived on the first official first day of school.

A Return to the Roots of Childhood

Dec 15, 2005

At 68, Barb Fuller-Curry lives across the road from the farm where she grew up, in Whiteside County, Ill. In her youth, Fuller-Curry's father and mother took turns working the fields in order to make ends meet.

After raising her own family elsewhere, Fuller-Curry returned to the farm after 40 years to care for her mother, who passed away earlier this year. The house Curry lives in is one her parents built.

Speaking with her 34-year-old son, Craig, Fuller-Curry recalled the sacrifices her parents made -- and how little she thought about it at the time, when she was just 7.

Kidnapped Tourists Killed in Yemen

Oct 27, 2002

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The complete act that started public media. Subpart D — Corporation for Public Broadcasting Sec. 396. [47 U.S.C. 396] Corporation for Public Broadcasting (a) Congressional declaration of policy The Congress hereby finds and declares that —

Eight years before WUIS began began broadcasting, the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 initiated consideration in communities and colleges what might be done with public media. "It announces to the world that our Nation wants more than just material wealth; our Nation wants more than a "chicken in every pot." We in America have an appetite for excellence, too. While we work every day to produce new goods and to create new wealth, we want most of all to enrich man's spirit. That is the purpose of this act." President Lyndon Johnson's remarks up signing the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967

Pages

Community Voices - Past This I Believe Essays

Amelia Paries at the microphone
Dan LaGrasso / NPR Illinois

This I Believe: 26 Letters

From the moment we're born, we're bombarded with an endless array of words. Long, short, pretty, ugly—but all meaningless. Until we’re taught to read and write. But, even before then, we have to learn the alphabet. It's amazing, truly, how many ways those 26 little letters can be manipulated; the seemingly endless combinations that make up the language we know and take for granted.

Read More

Social Action - Thanks for Sharing!

Sam Dunklau / NPR Illinois

What Do You Want To Know About Rebuilding Illinois’ Roads, Bridges And Infrastructure?

The need for new or repaired roads, bridges, buildings and other infrastructure in Illinois continues to outpace the amount of funding available to complete the projects. With a new governor and legislative session starting in January, discussions have already started with an aim to change that. Illinois Newsroom will follow negotiations of a capital plan. And we want to know what questions you have about what needs to be fixed, how lawmakers set priorities, how to pay for it, and other...

Read More
Reporting and analysis taking you beyond the daily news and providing a deeper understanding of our state. 

The 21st

21st century conversation for the 21st state.

Mondays-Thursdays
11 AM - Noon
11 PM - Midnight

Analysis & commentary on the events that made news this past week in Illinois state government & politics.

Fridays 12:30-1 PM, 7:30-8 PM
Saturdays 6:30-7 AM

Politics

The longest partial government shutdown in U.S. history continues to dominate the news out of the nation's capital. But the Mueller investigation also looms over Washington, D.C.

Federal employees went without their first paycheck since the partial government shutdown began. Jo Ann Goodlow, a mother of three from Phoenix, turned to crowdsourcing for help.

With the partial federal government shutdown dragging on, Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye says Congress should exempt tribes from feeling the effects. Historically, treaties with the U.S. government have guaranteed the Navajo and many other tribes federal financial assistance for health, education and economic development. So the shutdown is having an outsized impact.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro is set to formally launch his bid for president on Saturday, after weeks of hinting he was ready to join the growing 2020 Democratic primary field.

The 44-year-old will be the first Hispanic candidate to enter the race for the White House, joining Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard who recently said they are running. Several more well known candidates are expected to announce their plans soon.

The partial government shutdown is now the longest in history, as Saturday marks day 22. The previous record was 21 days, set in the winter of 1995-'96 when President Bill Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich were at odds over budget cuts.

READ MORE POLITICS STORIES

The X from NPR Illinois | 91.9-3 HD

Tiny Desk Sketches: An Illustrator's Year In The Front Row

As an illustrator at NPR, my work includes creating editorial illustrations for news stories, photo illustrations for the NPR Music team, looping animations for smart displays, and the occasional journalistic drawing foray out in Washington, D.C. Few things make me say, "I can't believe this is part of my real job" quite like sketching Tiny Desk concerts as they happen. I usually try to get to the desk during sound check to give myself a little extra time. Even so, it's a mad rush to get a...

Read More

NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

For Opera Singers, Life After Retirement — At Least At One Very Special Rest Home

Opera star Renée Fleming drew concern last year after a New York Times profile suggested the acclaimed soprano would be retiring. Luckily for fans, it turned out to be a false alarm. But if Fleming does ever start to ponder retirement, she might consider a move to Milan — where she'd likely be welcomed with open arms at Casa Verdi, a retirement home for opera singers and musicians founded by the famed Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi more than 100 years ago. Soprano Lina Vasta spent her career...

Read More