Top Stories

Wojcicki Jimenez campaign

State Rep. Reflects On Her Tenure And The Future Of Women In Politics

State Rep. Sara Wojcicki-Jimenez, a Republican from Leland Grove, announced she would not be seeking re-election last year.

Read More

Trending Stories

Students have access to hundreds of courses while they are in Illinois' juvenile justice facilities, but they tend to focus on math, language arts, social studies and science.
Tara Garcia Mathewson / The Hechinger Report

Online Learning Can Open Doors For Kids In Juvenile Jails

But the quality of online coursework is one of many concerns for advocates.

Read More

Education Desk

Editor's note on Aug. 8, 2018: This piece has been substantially updated from a version published in 2014.

A solemn little boy with a bowl haircut is telling Mr. Rogers that his pet got hit by a car. More precisely, he's confiding this to Daniel Striped Tiger, the hand puppet that, Rogers' wife, Joanne, says, "pretty much was Fred."

Read More Education Stories

Statehouse

Wojcicki Jimenez campaign

State Rep. Sara Wojcicki-Jimenez, a Republican from Leland Grove, announced she would not be seeking re-election last year. 

Read More Statehouse Stories

Health+Harvest Desk

Jaclyn Driscoll / NPR Illinois

It’s been a recommendation for years, but now it’s law in Illinois. Children may not be flipped forward in their car seats until they are two years old unless they are at least 40 pounds or 40 inches tall. 

Read More Health+Harvest Stories

Arts & Life

In the early '90s, scarring kids for life became big business. R.L. Stine and Christopher Pike became brand name industries, minting money and traumatizing children. Stine had his Fear Street and Goosebumps series, while Pike turned out a seemingly endless line of young adult novels about teenagers killing teenagers, ancient dinosaurs disguised as teenagers killing teenagers, ghost teenagers killing non-ghost teenagers, and Greek gods reincarnated as teenagers killing teenagers. But this was simply the final development in decades of YA horror.

Read More Arts & Life Stories

Equity

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

A small group of about 25 white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite The Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va.

The demonstrators have since left D.C. via Metro, and WAMU's Elly Yu reports that many counterprotestors have headed home, too.

Read More Equity Stories

Illinois Economy

Community member comments.
Lizzie Roehrs / NPR Illinois

Panelists in Moline joined NPR Illinois for the Seeking Solutions forum exploring the issue of residents leaving the state to move elsewhere.

Read More Illinois Economy Coverage

The Illinois Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in case challenging the state's so-called "Amazon tax." The decision could change the way Illinois websites make money online. Brian Mackey reports.

When you click a product link on a website — like if a blogger links to a book she's reviewing — the blogger can make a deal with the retailer to get a cut of the sale.

Amanda Vinicky/WUIS

Illinois' stack of overdue bills is smaller, thanks to stronger-than expected tax revenues.  But as lawmakers begin finalizing a new state budget, one of the state's chief fiscal officers is cautioning lawmakers to get thrifty.  

Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka's wearing a purple, long-sleeved knit dress.  It's by St. John's, a designer label whose dresses retail for about $800. Topinka brags she got it for $7 at Goodwill.

Schools that have sexual education classes would have to go beyond "abstinence-only" under a measure Illinois legislators sent the governor. The plan seeks to ensure students are getting medically accurate and age appropriate information.

                                                       

The measure does not require schools to offer sex ed courses.

But if they do ... the legislation mandates that middle and high schools include information about birth control.

Senator Linda Holmes is a Democrat, from Aurora:

 Former superintendent Walter Milton’s separation agreement with District 186 violated open meeting laws, according to an opinion by the state’s Attorney General. The previous school board decided to part ways with Milton during the winter before his contract was up. So, the members approved a severance plan worth over $175,000 and agreed to pay health and dental insurance.

http://alertsense.com/Home/AlertSense

Residents in the Springfield area can now sign up to have alerts about severe weather and other emergencies sent right to their phone.

The city received a $10,000 grant to set up the new system.  The money comes through the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, which distributes federal funds to city and county governments for public safety programs and disaster preparedness tools.

Amanda Vinicky

A state pension overhaul backed by government employee unions may save only half of what advocates had promised.  That underscores an ongoing battle between the House and Senate over pensions, with only ten days left in the legislative session.  

 

There's general agreement on this much: that Illinois' public pension systems have $100 billion dollars in unfunded liabilities.  That's a fancy word that basically means "debt."

It's a big number that's getting Illinois in trouble with bond houses and eating into the state's budget.

Bill Wheelhouse / Harvest Public Media

As Congress fiddles with major farm legislation, there’s a portion of it that gets very little attention. Some say it is a difference-maker for job creation in small rural communities,and provides a boost those towns need. 

Dominic Genetti

Monday night's severe storms stopped the presses of the local newspaper in Hannibal, Missouri. A widespread power outage prevented the Hannibal Courier-Post from getting a print edition to readers.  Reporters there, including Dominic Genetti, used the internet and social media to provide news updates on damage caused by 90 mile-an-hour winds.   As Genetti told Peter Gray on Illinois Edition Tuesday, two funnel clouds were reportedly spotted just outside of town last night:

  Foreign exchange students who spent this past school year in central Illinois with their host families are bidding them adieu. At a recent dinner 14 exchange students from countries like Spain, Thailand, and Germany shared meals from their native countries as they prepare to return home:

 

Chris Reid is mixing up a crockpot full of bright colored noodles and meatballs, food she helped her foreign exchange daughter from Toyko cook for tonight’s farewell ceremony…

SJ-R.com

A major medical expansion, the retail boom continues in Springfield and we update farmers’ planting progress on this week’s business report with Tim Landis, Business Editor of the State Journal-Register:

Pages

Community Voices

Rachel Otwell

Uncovering & Commemorating Springfield’s 1908 Race Riot

Kathryn Harris remembers coming across a manila folder, tucked away in a filing cabinet. It was the seventies, and she was working at Springfield’s public Lincoln Library at the time. The newspaper clippings inside told a story of a city in flames, of lynching s and death — something she hadn’t remembered hearing before.

Read More

Featured

Genetic Tests Can Hurt Your Chances Of Getting Some Types Of Insurance

Taking a genetic test in your 20s or 30s could, indeed, affect your ability to get long-term-care insurance later — or at least the price you'll pay. And people who are considering enrolling in Medicare after age 65 would do well to read the fine print of the sign-up rules. Readers have insurance questions on these topics this month, and we have answers: Q: Can getting a genetic test interfere with being able to buy long-term-care insurance in the future? If you do get a plan, can the insurer...

Read More

Politics

Janet Clark hopes to keep her dairy farm in the family. She inherited Vision Aire Farms from her parents, and now runs it with her younger brother.

The farm is idyllic, tucked away amid rolling green hills of corn and sunflower fields. One side of the farm holds a line of calves. They are individually fed by Clark's children and their cousins, playfully holding milk bottles for them to drink.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

In the fall of 2016, as reports of Russian-backed hacking of state election systems were surfacing, Georgia's Secretary of State, Brian Kemp, rejected federal offers of help to secure his state's voting systems.

"The question remains whether the federal government will subvert the Constitution to achieve the goal of federalizing elections under the guise of security," Kemp told a technology website.

Updated at 8:56 a.m. ET Sunday

Results from primary elections in Hawaii show Democratic Gov. David Ige likely holding onto his job after a challenge from Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, who currently represents Hawaii's 1st Congressional District.

In other high-profile contests, former congressman Ed Case appeared to be headed back to Washington to represent Hawaii's 1st Congressional District, while Rep. Tulsi Gabbard easily won re-election in the party nomination to represent Hawaii's 2nd Congressional District.

READ MORE POLITICS STORIES

The 21st: Weekdays 11 AM - Noon Weeknights 11 PM - Midnight

Participate by calling 800-222-9455.

The X from NPR Illinois | 91.9-3 HD

More Tiny Desk Contest 'Deskoveries' From Across The Country

Our 2018 Tiny Desk Contest On the Road tour brought us incredible musical discoveries in every city we visited. Year after year, this Contest would be nothing without our dedicated community of creators from every state. We couldn't feature all these artists on our one (short) tour, but luckily, plenty of NPR Member stations from across the country produced their own events featuring some of their local Contest favorites — so we asked them to recap their shows for us. You can read about some...

Read More

NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

Seeking Pay Equity, Female Flutist Sues Boston Symphony Orchestra

Boston Symphony Orchestra principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe has filed a lawsuit against the orchestra, claiming that she is making substantially less each year than her closest peer — a man. Rowe's suit was filed in Massachusetts' Suffolk County Superior Court on Monday morning, the day after a new, statewide equal pay law went into effect. Her suit may be the first gender pay equity claim filed under the Massachusetts Equal Pay Law (MEPA). She is asking for more than $200,000 in unpaid wages...

Read More