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Sara Wojcicki Jimenez and Bruce Rauner
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Law Aims To Return State Jobs To Springfield

Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed legislation meant to bring state jobs back to Springfield.

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Annabelle Shemer, Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Pharmacist's Order: Birth Control Without The Doctor

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Students have access to hundreds of courses while they are in Illinois' juvenile justice facilities, but they tend to focus on math, language arts, social studies and science.
Tara Garcia Mathewson / The Hechinger Report

Online Learning Can Open Doors For Kids In Juvenile Jails

But the quality of online coursework is one of many concerns for advocates.

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Education Desk

Editor's note on Aug. 8, 2018: This piece has been substantially updated from a version published in 2014.

A solemn little boy with a bowl haircut is telling Mr. Rogers that his pet got hit by a car. More precisely, he's confiding this to Daniel Striped Tiger, the hand puppet that, Rogers' wife, Joanne, says, "pretty much was Fred."

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Statehouse

Sara Wojcicki Jimenez and Bruce Rauner
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed legislation meant to bring state jobs back to Springfield.

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Health+Harvest Desk

Jaclyn Driscoll / NPR Illinois

It’s been a recommendation for years, but now it’s law in Illinois. Children may not be flipped forward in their car seats until they are two years old unless they are at least 40 pounds or 40 inches tall. 

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Arts & Life

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Equity

Morning News Brief

9 hours ago

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Illinois Economy

Community member comments.
Lizzie Roehrs / NPR Illinois

Panelists in Moline joined NPR Illinois for the Seeking Solutions forum exploring the issue of residents leaving the state to move elsewhere.

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Court Gives AG More Time For Concealed Carry Appeal

May 3, 2013
facebook.com/lisamadigan

The U.S. Supreme Court is giving Illinois’ attorney general more time to decide whether to appeal a ruling that the state’s ban on the public possession of firearms is unconstitutional.

Attorney General Lisa Madigan now has until June 24 to ask the high court to hear the case.

The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals found Illinois’ prohibition on the carrying of concealed firearms unconstitutional in December.  

It ordered lawmakers to pass legislation to legalize concealed carry by June 9.  The 30-day extension granted by the court Friday does not affect that deadline.

  Katharine Eastvold lost her run for Springfield school board by a single vote about three weeks ago. But she’s not quite done fighting for the seat. A partial recount earlier this week found the votes had been accurately recorded. Donna Moore was declared the winner by only one vote in subdistrict 5. But it’s not yet over. The next step says Eastvold is working with her lawyer to determine whether there’s enough evidence to warrant asking a judge for a full recount.

 The funerals for five people murdered last week in Manchester are over, but donations are still being sought to offset those costs.

The victims were five family members, including two small children. Services took place at the Mackey Daws Funeral Home in the town of Roodhouse. Justin Daws is the funeral director there. He says the burials also occurred this week – though payments have yet to be made. Daws says the area in west central Illinois is tight-knit and he will wait indefinitely for funds from the victim’s family to come in:

A plan that will leave state employees and teachers with reduced retirement benefits made it out of the Illinois House Thursday, potentially paving the way for the pension overhaul that has thus far eluded lawmakers.  But it also ignites a face-off between two of the state's top Democrats — with the potential to keep a pension overhaul as elusive as it's ever been.

Illinois' legislators have less than a month before they're scheduled to adjourn.  The Speaker of the Illinois House made some predictions about what will — and what may not — happen before then.

A measure to legalize same sex marriage in Illinois already got state Senators' approval.

But the Speaker of the Illinois House says there's not enough support for it to pass in that chamber.

Mike Madigan said in March that gay marriage was a dozen votes shy in the House. 

The Illinois House of Representatives on Thursday approved a massive overhaul of state pensions. It's the first time the House has passed such a plan after more than a year of negotiating and many failed attempts.

Its also the first time Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, put his full support behind a specific proposal.

Police officers from across Illinois gathered in Springfield Thursday to honor colleagues killed in the line of duty — including one killed in 2012.

On the Monday after Thanksgiving, Illinois State Police Trooper Kyle Deatherage was patrolling on his motorcycle on Interstate 55, about 30 miles south of Springfield. He pulled over another vehicle when the driver of a semi-truck is alleged to have hit and killed Deatherage. The driver has been charged with reckless homicide.

Illinois lawmakers are "weighing in" on Olympic organizers' decision to drop wrestling from the summer games. 

The Illinois House passed a resolution encouraging the International Olympic Committee to reinstate wrestling as an Olympic sport.   The state Senate is poised to do the same.

Former U-S House Speaker Denny Hastert made a special appearance in Springfield for it.  Hastert was a wrestling coach in Yorkville before he went on to Congress.  He says it's important to give young people the opportunity to reach for an Olympic dream. 

  The Central Illinois Foodbank collects grocery items and gives them to charitable organizations in over 20 counties. The foodbank will be moving its Springfield location later this year to a new donated facility. Kaleigh Friend with the foodbank recently joined WUIS’ Rachel Otwell for this interview:

CLICK HERE for more information about the Central Illinois Foodbank.

Consumers who unwittingly buy a diseased animal from a pet store could get their money back under a measure approved by the Illinois Senate. 

 

It's similar to someone who buys a jalopy under false pretenses. But in this case, the "lemon" isn't a car.

It's a puppy. Or a kitten.

Someone who buys a dog or cat could get a refund, exchange their pet for a new one, or seek reimbursement for veterinarians' fees.

But only if the pet came from a pet shop.  That bothers Republican Senator Dale Righter of Mattoon, as those dogs can cost $1,000.

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Community Voices

Rachel Otwell

Uncovering & Commemorating Springfield’s 1908 Race Riot

Kathryn Harris remembers coming across a manila folder, tucked away in a filing cabinet. It was the seventies, and she was working at Springfield’s public Lincoln Library at the time. The newspaper clippings inside told a story of a city in flames, of lynching s and death — something she hadn’t remembered hearing before.

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Social Action - Thanks for Sharing!

Statewide: The Whole World's Watching 50 Years Later

The debut episode of Statewide includes: A look back at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago An assasination role play game in schools Increasing popularity of lacrosse across Illinois Renovations to Ronald Reagan's boyhood home in Dixon 1860 photo of Abraham Lincoln coming to Illinois courthouses The effect of online learning in juvenile jails Progress and work still to be done at the Illinois State Fairgrounds

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Featured

Genetic Tests Can Hurt Your Chances Of Getting Some Types Of Insurance

Taking a genetic test in your 20s or 30s could, indeed, affect your ability to get long-term-care insurance later — or at least the price you'll pay. And people who are considering enrolling in Medicare after age 65 would do well to read the fine print of the sign-up rules. Readers have insurance questions on these topics this month, and we have answers: Q: Can getting a genetic test interfere with being able to buy long-term-care insurance in the future? If you do get a plan, can the insurer...

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Politics

Friday News Roundup - International

1 hour ago

The United States re-imposed sanctions on Iran this week, after pulling out of the Iran nuclear deal earlier this year. Renegotiating the deal was a key campaign promise for President Trump, but tension between the two countries has escalated.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

1 hour ago

This week, primaries and special elections in five states set the tone as midterms inch closer.

On Tuesday, voters in Ohio, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, and Washington had their say — and the results were mixed.

Here’s a take from The Washington Post on the winners and losers.

Nageeb Alomari has lived the Trump Administration's travel ban.

Alomari is from Yemen, and he moved to the U.S. in the 1990s. He worked at gas stations in Alabama, then California.

President Trump ordered a doubling of U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Turkey Friday, escalating a diplomatic spat with a key NATO ally.

In a tweet, Trump cited the decline in Turkish currency as justification for increasing tariffs to 50 percent on Turkish steel and 20 percent on Turkish aluminum.

"Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!" Trump tweeted.

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The X from NPR Illinois | 91.9-3 HD

More Tiny Desk Contest 'Deskoveries' From Across The Country

Our 2018 Tiny Desk Contest On the Road tour brought us incredible musical discoveries in every city we visited. Year after year, this Contest would be nothing without our dedicated community of creators from every state. We couldn't feature all these artists on our one (short) tour, but luckily, plenty of NPR Member stations from across the country produced their own events featuring some of their local Contest favorites — so we asked them to recap their shows for us. You can read about some...

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NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

Seeking Pay Equity, Female Flutist Sues Boston Symphony Orchestra

Boston Symphony Orchestra principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe has filed a lawsuit against the orchestra, claiming that she is making substantially less each year than her closest peer — a man. Rowe's suit was filed in Massachusetts' Suffolk County Superior Court on Monday morning, the day after a new, statewide equal pay law went into effect. Her suit may be the first gender pay equity claim filed under the Massachusetts Equal Pay Law (MEPA). She is asking for more than $200,000 in unpaid wages...

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